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Common Core

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#1
Hoganknows

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You young guys with kids going to school soon better google this and check it out....nuff said for now!
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#2
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Isn't that Vandy's nickname? The Common Cores?
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#3
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Dumbing down...

Here's a pretty good write-up from, The Washington Post (of all places)...


"Variously motivated corporate interests, arguing that the core was being sloppily taught, organized a behind-the-scenes campaign to super-standardize it. They named their handiwork the Common Core State Standards to hide the fact that it was driven by policymakers in Washington D.C., who have thus far shoved it into every state except Alaska, Minnesota, Nebraska, Texas, and Virginia.
This was done with insufficient public dialogue or feedback from experienced educators, no research, no pilot or experimental programs — no evidence at all that a floor-length list created by unnamed people attempting to standardize what’s taught is a good idea.
It’s a bad idea. Ignore the fact that specific Common Core State Standards will open up enough cans of worms to keep subject-matter specialists arguing among themselves forever. Consider instead the merit of Standards from a general perspective:
One: Standards shouldn’t be attached to school subjects, but to the qualities of mind it’s hoped the study of school subjects promotes. Subjects are mere tools, just as scalpels, acetylene torches, and transits are tools. Surgeons, welders, surveyors — and teachers — should be held accountable for the quality of what they produce, not how they produce it.
Two: The world changes. The future is indiscernible. Clinging to a static strategy in a dynamic world may be comfortable, even comforting, but it’s a Titanic-deck-chair exercise.
Three: The Common Core Standards assumethat what kids need to know is covered by one or another of the traditional core subjects. In fact, the unexplored intellectual terrain lying between and beyond those familiar fields of study is vast, expands by the hour, and will go in directions no one can predict.
Four: So much orchestrated attention is being showered on the Common Core Standards, the main reason for poor student performance is being ignored—a level of childhood poverty the consequences of which no amount of schooling can effectively counter.
Five: The Common Core kills innovation. When it’s the only game in town, it’s the only game in town.
Six: The Common Core Standards are a set-up for national standardized tests, tests that can’t evaluate complex thought, can’t avoid cultural bias, can’t measure non-verbal learning, can’t predict anything of consequence (and waste boatloads of money).
Seven: The word “standards” gets an approving nod from the public (and from most educators) because it means “performance that meets a standard.” However, the word also means “like everybody else,” and standardizing minds is what the Standards try to do. Common Core Standards fans sell the first meaning; the Standards deliver the second meaning. Standardized minds are about as far out of sync with deep-seated American values as it’s possible to get.
Eight: The Common Core Standards’ stated aim — “success in college and careers”— is at best pedestrian, at worst an affront. The young should be exploring the potentials of humanness.
I’ve more beefs, but like these eight, they have to do with the quality of education, and the pursuit of educational quality isn’t what’s driving the present education reform farce.
An illustration: As I write, my wife is in the kitchen. She calls me for lunch. The small television suspended under the kitchen cabinets is tuned to CNN, and Time cover girl Michelle Rhee is being interviewed.
“On international tests,” she says, “the U.S. ranks 27th from the top.”
Michelle Rhee, three-year teacher, education reactionary, mainstream media star, fired authoritarian head of a school system being investigated for cheating on standardized tests, is given a national platform to misinform. She doesn’t explain that, at the insistence of policymakers, and unlike other countries, America tests every kid — the mentally disabled, the sick, the hungry, the homeless, the transient, the troubled, those for whom English is a second language. That done, the scores are lumped together. She doesn’t even hint that when the scores of the disadvantaged aren’t counted, American students are at the top.
If Michelle Rhee doesn’t know that, she shouldn’t be on CNN. If she knows it but fails to point it out, she shouldn’t be on CNN.
It’s hard not to compare Rhee with Jennifer, a friend of my oldest son. He wrote me recently:

…I asked Jenn if she was ready for school.
“I’m waiting for an email from my principal to find out if I can get into my classroom a week early.”
“Why a whole week?”
“To get my room ready.
She teaches second graders. I ask her why she loves that grade. She laughs and says, “Because they haven’t learned to roll their eyes yet.”
But I know it’s much more than that. Her sister was down from Ohio for Jenn’s birthday, and when she asked her what she wanted, Jenn said she needed 18 sets of colored pencils, 18 boxes of #2 pencils, 18 boxes of crayons, construction paper, name tags and so on — $346 dollars total.
She’s been doing this for 25 years. I’m sure she makes less than I do, but they could probably cut her salary 25 or 30% and she’d still want to get into her room early.”

Rhee gets $50,000 a pop plus first-class travel and accommodations for putting in an appearance to tell her audiences what’s wrong with the Jennifers in America’s schools, and what clubs should be swung or held over their heads to scare them into shaping up.
Future historians (if there are any) are going to shake their heads in disbelief. They’ll wonder how, in a single generation, the world’s oldest democracy dismantled its engine — free, public, locally controlled, democratic education.
If they dig into the secretive process that produced the Common Core State Standards, most of their questions will be answered."

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#4
NextYearIsHere

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We've been working with it for a couple of years now. It's not dumbing down, its making sh*tty states that dont care about education like mine take the higher standards (though tougher standards wont do too much IMO)
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#5
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What that money again goes to in the stimulus, you know, 40 or 50 pages later: Improving collection and use of data. The State will establish a longitudinal data system that includes elements described in Section 604(e)(2)(d) of the America COMPETES Act. So you have to look that up. But that's the key. If you want any money, you have to put together a data collection service. What is the data collection service? Well, this I contend is one of the reasons why we had the turtle tunnels and everything else that everybody talked about. Because it kept you away from things like this: $5 billion.

Now, Arne Duncan, the Secretary of Education, called this a historic opportunity. I call it bribery. Race to the Top gave the federal government billions of dollars to dangle in front of the cash starved states and they dangled and said, 'All you have to do is sign up for this program. You'll get the cash.' And state after state signed.

These databases will track all kinds of personal data, including but certainly not limited to healthcare histories, income information, the religious affiliation of your family, voting family status, blood types, blood test result, homework completion, hair color, eye color, whether a child was premature or not, do they have any birthmarks, even bus stop arrival information. It goes deep, deep. If they have 44 data points, they can tell you an awful lot about they can tell you just pretty much anything. These are hundreds of data points collected on your children for over 20 years. This is the groundwork for a national student database that will track your kids and their personal information from preschool until the stated end of 20.


You better keep checking guys!!!


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#6
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View PostNextYearIsHere, on 30 March 2013 - 10:46 AM, said:

We've been working with it for a couple of years now. It's not dumbing down, its making sh*tty states that dont care about education like mine take the higher standards (though tougher standards wont do too much IMO)

Dream on....you've been brain washed already
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#7
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View PostKneesInTheBreeze, on 30 March 2013 - 09:48 AM, said:

Dumbing down...

Here's a pretty good write-up from, The Washington Post (of all places)...


"Variously motivated corporate interests, arguing that the core was being sloppily taught, organized a behind-the-scenes campaign to super-standardize it. They named their handiwork the Common Core State Standards to hide the fact that it was driven by policymakers in Washington D.C., who have thus far shoved it into every state except Alaska, Minnesota, Nebraska, Texas, and Virginia.
This was done with insufficient public dialogue or feedback from experienced educators, no research, no pilot or experimental programs — no evidence at all that a floor-length list created by unnamed people attempting to standardize what’s taught is a good idea.
It’s a bad idea. Ignore the fact that specific Common Core State Standards will open up enough cans of worms to keep subject-matter specialists arguing among themselves forever. Consider instead the merit of Standards from a general perspective:
One: Standards shouldn’t be attached to school subjects, but to the qualities of mind it’s hoped the study of school subjects promotes. Subjects are mere tools, just as scalpels, acetylene torches, and transits are tools. Surgeons, welders, surveyors — and teachers — should be held accountable for the quality of what they produce, not how they produce it.
Two: The world changes. The future is indiscernible. Clinging to a static strategy in a dynamic world may be comfortable, even comforting, but it’s a Titanic-deck-chair exercise.
Three: The Common Core Standards assumethat what kids need to know is covered by one or another of the traditional core subjects. In fact, the unexplored intellectual terrain lying between and beyond those familiar fields of study is vast, expands by the hour, and will go in directions no one can predict.
Four: So much orchestrated attention is being showered on the Common Core Standards, the main reason for poor student performance is being ignored—a level of childhood poverty the consequences of which no amount of schooling can effectively counter.
Five: The Common Core kills innovation. When it’s the only game in town, it’s the only game in town.
Six: The Common Core Standards are a set-up for national standardized tests, tests that can’t evaluate complex thought, can’t avoid cultural bias, can’t measure non-verbal learning, can’t predict anything of consequence (and waste boatloads of money).
Seven: The word “standards” gets an approving nod from the public (and from most educators) because it means “performance that meets a standard.” However, the word also means “like everybody else,” and standardizing minds is what the Standards try to do. Common Core Standards fans sell the first meaning; the Standards deliver the second meaning. Standardized minds are about as far out of sync with deep-seated American values as it’s possible to get.
Eight: The Common Core Standards’ stated aim — “success in college and careers”— is at best pedestrian, at worst an affront. The young should be exploring the potentials of humanness.
I’ve more beefs, but like these eight, they have to do with the quality of education, and the pursuit of educational quality isn’t what’s driving the present education reform farce.
An illustration: As I write, my wife is in the kitchen. She calls me for lunch. The small television suspended under the kitchen cabinets is tuned to CNN, and Time cover girl Michelle Rhee is being interviewed.
“On international tests,” she says, “the U.S. ranks 27th from the top.”
Michelle Rhee, three-year teacher, education reactionary, mainstream media star, fired authoritarian head of a school system being investigated for cheating on standardized tests, is given a national platform to misinform. She doesn’t explain that, at the insistence of policymakers, and unlike other countries, America tests every kid — the mentally disabled, the sick, the hungry, the homeless, the transient, the troubled, those for whom English is a second language. That done, the scores are lumped together. She doesn’t even hint that when the scores of the disadvantaged aren’t counted, American students are at the top.
If Michelle Rhee doesn’t know that, she shouldn’t be on CNN. If she knows it but fails to point it out, she shouldn’t be on CNN.
It’s hard not to compare Rhee with Jennifer, a friend of my oldest son. He wrote me recently:

…I asked Jenn if she was ready for school.
“I’m waiting for an email from my principal to find out if I can get into my classroom a week early.”
“Why a whole week?”
“To get my room ready.
She teaches second graders. I ask her why she loves that grade. She laughs and says, “Because they haven’t learned to roll their eyes yet.”
But I know it’s much more than that. Her sister was down from Ohio for Jenn’s birthday, and when she asked her what she wanted, Jenn said she needed 18 sets of colored pencils, 18 boxes of #2 pencils, 18 boxes of crayons, construction paper, name tags and so on — $346 dollars total.
She’s been doing this for 25 years. I’m sure she makes less than I do, but they could probably cut her salary 25 or 30% and she’d still want to get into her room early.”

Rhee gets $50,000 a pop plus first-class travel and accommodations for putting in an appearance to tell her audiences what’s wrong with the Jennifers in America’s schools, and what clubs should be swung or held over their heads to scare them into shaping up.
Future historians (if there are any) are going to shake their heads in disbelief. They’ll wonder how, in a single generation, the world’s oldest democracy dismantled its engine — free, public, locally controlled, democratic education.
If they dig into the secretive process that produced the Common Core State Standards, most of their questions will be answered."


Keep digging...Google David Coleman...Bill Gates....Eli Broad
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#8
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View PostHoganknows, on 30 March 2013 - 08:12 PM, said:



Dream on....you've been brain washed already

Whatever you say, Governor Wallace.
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View PostNextYearIsHere, on 31 March 2013 - 08:12 AM, said:

Whatever you say, Governor Wallace.

OK, Mr. Obama or could it be Jesse Jackson
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#10
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#11
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View PostHoganknows, on 31 March 2013 - 02:24 PM, said:

OK, Mr. Obama or could it be Jesse Jackson

Naw...
with his thought processes, he's more like Charlie Rangel.

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View PostHoganknows, on 31 March 2013 - 02:24 PM, said:

OK, Mr. Obama or could it be Jesse Jackson

Hahahahaha.


I call you a segregationist and you call me a president and civil rights leader.... Thanks?
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President only in name...more like failure for our country....socialist.....hand-outs for all
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#14
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View PostHoganknows, on 01 April 2013 - 03:56 AM, said:

President only in name...more like failure for our country....socialist.....hand-outs for all


This is why the GOP can't win elections. This is your base.
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So the Feds offered states money to opt in and they pretty much all took it. Arizona was the 47th to opt in Friday.  The reason that the program is needed is because states have monkeyed with graduation requirements so much that it only takes a 9th or 10th grade education to graduate (most likely because of no child left behind).  The old HS diploma ain't worth what it used to be.

The new requirements are meant to provide a consistent scale to evaluate the preparedness of students.  Really in one sense this may hurt some schools, but with the increases in private and charter schools it may also to be a way to evaluate the quality of education children are getting across systems and state lines.

They are mandating that 70% of literature be nonfiction.  That has lit teachers in an uproar as it should considering that nonfiction is also known as history.  

I saw some stuff that indicated that Common Core was meant to better prepare people for trade vocations than promote reading and learning.  What else am I missing?

Also someone was saying that it was 30% tougher so I was wondering if it was not just another cog in the wheel of education privatization.  Although that is my soap box I do not know if that is a/the motive of common core.

Edited by SECorBust, 01 April 2013 - 01:56 PM.

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