Any youth baseball coaches here..? - Water Fountain - SECTalk.com

Jump to content

Welcome to SECTalk.com

Welcome to SECTalk.com -- The Home of 6 Straight National Titles!

You are currently accessing our site as a guest which means you can't access all of our features such as social groups, sports betting, and many more. By joining our free community you will have access to all of these great features as well as to participating in our forums, contacting other members, and much more. Registration only takes a minute and SECTalk.com is absolutely free, so please join today!

If you have any problems registering or signing in, please contact us.

Any youth baseball coaches here..?

- - - - -

This topic has been archived. This means that you cannot reply to this topic.
14 replies to this topic

#1
RedRebelBlue

RedRebelBlue
  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • Posts:
    153
  • Joined:
    Jul 2011
  • Cash:
    0
  • High Fives:
    94
I've been coaching recreational Dizzy Dean baseball for a few years now, and am absolutely ready to get the season started. I've coached my older son for the last couple of years, and now, I'm coaching my younger son as he enters his first year of kid pitch (9 and 10 year old ball). My team name is the Pirates, and my younger son is so excited about getting to play for me this year, he decided that the Pittsburgh Pirates needs to be mine and his favorite team....so I'm going along with it..lol

Anyway......any fellow coaches have tips or drills y'all want to exchange, particularly ANY kind of help with developing pitchers? I lost all three of my pitchers from last season's team, so we're essentially starting from scratch.

#2
carwwest

carwwest

    Cowbell Crusader

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Posts:
    7,725
  • Joined:
    Jul 2007
  • Cash:
    0
  • High Fives:
    1,172
man i cant wait to coach my little one (many years down the way)...i helped coach my sisters softball team some years ago and ended up being the only coach for a while...it was awful because of the girl aspect but teaching the fundamentals and holding practice is the most fun for me...

im playing in a slow pitch softball league for the first time in a few years also and am STOKED...

now as far as developing pitchers, without getting into too many crazy mechanics, the best thing that i was ever taught at a young age was how to push off the rubber with my legs and not to throw with my arm...but 9-10 is still young...in terms of throwing strikes, get the team to pair off and during warm ups, make sure you tell all of them to try to hit the other kid right in the chest with the ball, whoever seems to be the most consistent will more than likely be able to give you some innings...

most importantly (speaking from experience as an assistant coach and umpire), have fun and dont let the parents make asses out of themselves if you can help it haha...

Posted Image

GTHOM


#3
Darth Vader

Darth Vader

    Dark Lord of the Sith

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Posts:
    16,714
  • Joined:
    Nov 2006
  • Cash:
    0
  • High Fives:
    9,971
I'm going into my 7th season coaching Dizzy Dean. Love it. I'll post more later.

#4
RedRebelBlue

RedRebelBlue
  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • Posts:
    153
  • Joined:
    Jul 2011
  • Cash:
    0
  • High Fives:
    94
We don't draft for another month in our local league, but I got my son and my assistant coach's son together to throw some balls around yesterday afternoon.

That unmistakable pop of a well thrown baseball hitting leather after a long winter is one of the best sounds on earth. I'm so ready to get this season started.

Dizzy Dean baseball is just fun. I coached a USSSA team this past fall, and while I love baseball....I just enjoy the pureness of ALL kids getting to play, as it is with recreational ball.

#5
pondwater jack

pondwater jack

    on the twittler @PondwaterJack

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Posts:
    562
  • Joined:
    Jul 2012
  • Cash:
    0
  • High Fives:
    156
i coached for a few years...all a fog now....after a bunch of stuff i didnt have anything to do with...i wss made a scapegoat and asked to step down..

#6
Herschel Talker

Herschel Talker

    Disney Dawg

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Posts:
    9,713
  • Joined:
    Nov 2006
  • Cash:
    0
  • High Fives:
    5,699
9-10 is the perfect age to just throw it slow and learn to throw strikes. Pitchers can learn a little more subtle location and add velocity later.

As mentioned, find your guys who are capable of throwing accurately. You're going to have a lot more success if the opponents hit the ball rather than walking 4 guys an inning.
Posted Image

#7
Mizzou_Fan

Mizzou_Fan
  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Posts:
    8,288
  • Joined:
    Jun 2012
  • Cash:
    0
  • High Fives:
    4,706

View PostHerschel Talker, on 19 February 2013 - 05:00 PM, said:

9-10 is the perfect age to just throw it slow and learn to throw strikes. Pitchers can learn a little more subtle location and add velocity later.

As mentioned, find your guys who are capable of throwing accurately. You're going to have a lot more success if the opponents hit the ball rather than walking 4 guys an inning.
This^ At that age, just find someone who can get the ball over the plate and do it consistently. Cut down on the walks and you should have some success. Adding velocity and maybe different pitches will come later.
Posted Image

#8
uscrules

uscrules
  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Posts:
    5,820
  • Joined:
    Aug 2005
  • Cash:
    0
  • High Fives:
    437
I coached Dixie Youth baseball for 21 years, coaching all age groups starting with the 9-10 year olds all the way through 15-16 year olds. I enjoyed the 11-12 and 13-14 year olds the best because they had developed the skills to play the game by then. I was also the creater of our local league and President of the leaque. In 21 years and all sorts of draft rules I never had a team finish worse than runner up most of the years we were the Champions. I also coached two state championship teams and once to the World Series of Dixe Youth. I loved the years I coached and still share a lot of memories with the kids I coached. For our 9-10 year olds (Minor League) this was the first year that kids pitched and if you were lucky enough to find a pitcher that could throw strikes you had it made, if you found two you had the making of a championship. Teaching kids to pitch properly at this age is very important, the habits they form at this age will follow them through their baseball careers. This age is all about base running, there are not many 9 or 10 year old catchers that can throw out a runner at second or third. So get kids on base, and run them, when they get to 3rd they usually score on a passed ball or wild pitch.

Edited by uscrules, 19 February 2013 - 06:02 PM.


#9
Darth Vader

Darth Vader

    Dark Lord of the Sith

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Posts:
    16,714
  • Joined:
    Nov 2006
  • Cash:
    0
  • High Fives:
    9,971

View PostMizzou_Fan, on 19 February 2013 - 05:47 PM, said:

This^ At that age, just find someone who can get the ball over the plate and do it consistently. Cut down on the walks and you should have some success. Adding velocity and maybe different pitches will come later.

Bingo. Now I usually work with outfielders but can speak to coaching pitchers as well. At the 9 & 10 yr old age, all you are really doing is introducing them to pitching. Work on their mechanics and pitching motion. Do not worry about velocity until much later. Just get them into a CONSISTANT throwing motion. Focus only on getting them to throwing constantly to a set strike zone. What you're looking for is to first develop the ability to get a pitch either outside low, inside high, or belt level outside as so forth. If you can get him to where he can place his pitches where he wants, you will have a good consistent 9&10 yr old level pitcher. Speed will come with time and repetition.

And for the love of all that is good do not teach them to throw a freaking curve ball. Their ligaments are still growing and developing and these can be damaged by trying to pitch a curve. This can be severe enough to end their baseball days before they're even out of Jr. High.

#10
Mizzou_Fan

Mizzou_Fan
  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Posts:
    8,288
  • Joined:
    Jun 2012
  • Cash:
    0
  • High Fives:
    4,706

View PostDarth Vader, on 19 February 2013 - 06:40 PM, said:

Bingo. Now I usually work with outfielders but can speak to coaching pitchers as well. At the 9 & 10 yr old age, all you are really doing is introducing them to pitching. Work on their mechanics and pitching motion. Do not worry about velocity until much later. Just get them into a CONSISTANT throwing motion. Focus only on getting them to throwing constantly to a set strike zone. What you're looking for is to first develop the ability to get a pitch either outside low, inside high, or belt level outside as so forth. If you can get him to where he can place his pitches where he wants, you will have a good consistent 9&10 yr old level pitcher. Speed will come with time and repetition.

And for the love of all that is good do not teach them to throw a freaking curve ball. Their ligaments are still growing and developing and these can be damaged by trying to pitch a curve. This can be severe enough to end their baseball days before they're even out of Jr. High.
You have of so many pitchers needing surgery at young ages due to throwing curve balls. I totally agree with everything you said, especially the curve ball.
Posted Image

#11
Herschel Talker

Herschel Talker

    Disney Dawg

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Posts:
    9,713
  • Joined:
    Nov 2006
  • Cash:
    0
  • High Fives:
    5,699
I also see a lot of coaches pitch a young guy too much. At that age, let's face it, you're only going to have a couple guys who can pitch well. But I see coaches throwing the same guy the whole game twice a week.

I know that curve balls are no good at that age....I'm not sure what the ideal pitch count is, but I just get nervous putting a guy out more than once a week or for an entire game. Thoughts?
Posted Image

#12
Darth Vader

Darth Vader

    Dark Lord of the Sith

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Posts:
    16,714
  • Joined:
    Nov 2006
  • Cash:
    0
  • High Fives:
    9,971

View PostMizzou_Fan, on 19 February 2013 - 06:49 PM, said:

You have of so many pitchers needing surgery at young ages due to throwing curve balls. I totally agree with everything you said, especially the curve ball.

Yep, I see kids on other teams who throw the curve and it does win games at this level due to the fact it totally blows the mind of kids in the batter's box. But what's the cost? Sure the kid is a big hero in little league. But his coach is winning games at the expense of the kids future. Yes, baseball at the level I'm coaching at (11&12) is about winning to the kids themselves. But winning is not worth costing a kid his future.

One thing I recommend to little league coaches is to have well planned structured practices. For us we split up with pitchers and catchers working with one coach, infielders working with another, outfielders working with me or another coach while I run kids through the batting cage. And while we're split into positions we're working postion specific drills. With The outfielders I focus first on fly balls, taking good angles, playing grounders, with a focus on backing each other up as well as any plays in the infield.

We will work drills and batting cage for probably half or more of a typical practice. The second half we will work situations with batters & base runners. The key is to keep players active and involved. Many little league coaches think practice consists of him standing at home plate with his bucket of balls and a bat hitting grounders and fly balls for 2 hours. That is a huge mistake. First, it does nothing to develop the fundamental skills of the players and it gets downright boring for the players as well.  Yes, this type of practice does have it's place and can be helpful. but doing this is actually the last step of the process and should not be done before the players are drilled and drilled in their individual postion skills.

#13
Darth Vader

Darth Vader

    Dark Lord of the Sith

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Posts:
    16,714
  • Joined:
    Nov 2006
  • Cash:
    0
  • High Fives:
    9,971

View PostHerschel Talker, on 19 February 2013 - 07:50 PM, said:

I also see a lot of coaches pitch a young guy too much. At that age, let's face it, you're only going to have a couple guys who can pitch well. But I see coaches throwing the same guy the whole game twice a week.

I know that curve balls are no good at that age....I'm not sure what the ideal pitch count is, but I just get nervous putting a guy out more than once a week or for an entire game. Thoughts?

Pitch count is a big deal now. I'd have to pull out my Dizzy Dean Rule Book but I think pitchers are restricted to something like 4 innings with a 24 hour rest required before he toes the rubber again. It's been a year since I cracked the book so I'm sure I'm leaving out details. One thing we do is keep an accurate pitch count for each pitcher in each game on top of tracking his innings. One assistant will count his pitches, including balls and strikes. The more you do this, the better picture you will get of how many pitches a pitcher can usually give. The key is to not listen to what he is telling you but watching his pitches instead. The reason for this is often a kid will want to keep going even when his arm is worn slap out an will tell you he can go. That's why you've got to really watch them for signs they are running out of steam.

#14
RedRebelBlue

RedRebelBlue
  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • Posts:
    153
  • Joined:
    Jul 2011
  • Cash:
    0
  • High Fives:
    94

View PostDarth Vader, on 19 February 2013 - 09:19 PM, said:

Pitch count is a big deal now. I'd have to pull out my Dizzy Dean Rule Book but I think pitchers are restricted to something like 4 innings with a 24 hour rest required before he toes the rubber again. It's been a year since I cracked the book so I'm sure I'm leaving out details. One thing we do is keep an accurate pitch count for each pitcher in each game on top of tracking his innings. One assistant will count his pitches, including balls and strikes. The more you do this, the better picture you will get of how many pitches a pitcher can usually give. The key is to not listen to what he is telling you but watching his pitches instead. The reason for this is often a kid will want to keep going even when his arm is worn slap out an will tell you he can go. That's why you've got to really watch them for signs they are running out of steam.

I think the rule is, if they go over 3 innings, there's a 48 hour rest period for 9 and 10 year olds.

This is good stuff, guys. Anyone who coaches this season, keep us updated on how your team is doing.....along with any tips you want to keep passing along.

#15
eastcoastrazorback

eastcoastrazorback

    Gagging Order

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Posts:
    3,479
  • Joined:
    Oct 2009
  • Cash:
    0
  • High Fives:
    2,225

View PostHerschel Talker, on 19 February 2013 - 05:00 PM, said:

9-10 is the perfect age to just throw it slow and learn to throw strikes. Pitchers can learn a little more subtle location and add velocity later.

As mentioned, find your guys who are capable of throwing accurately. You're going to have a lot more success if the opponents hit the ball rather than walking 4 guys an inning.

This is the best advice.

May the bridges I burn light the way.

[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]